Podcast Episode 8: Surviving Recovery

In today’s episode, John Sherman explains how a steady practice of self-directed attention will not only see you through the difficult time of recovery but will actually shorten the length of your recovery.

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Podcast Episode 6: An Interview with John Sherman

In this episode, John Sherman is interviewed by Regina Dawn Akers for Awakening Together Radio. In this conversation, John speaks about his work and his life. This interview was broadcast live on March 17, 2016.

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Podcast Episode 4: From Satsang to Just One Look

In this episode, John Sherman speaks about what made him leave the spiritual realm behind and devote his life to bringing the simple act of looking at yourself to everyone.

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Just One Look Is All It Takes

If you really understand that what you are trying to do is to get a taste of what it feels like to be you, whether you have a conscious experience of having touched yourself with your attention or not, you cannot fail. It’s the conscious movement of attention toward the feeling of ‘me’ that counts.

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Podcast Episode 3: The Power of Attention

In today’s episode, John Sherman speaks about the importance of developing the power you have to control your attention and use it to become self-reliant in your relationship with your own life.

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The Nature of Belief

Through no fault of our own, most humans—that is to say most of us—have minds that have come into being shaped by a context of fear and distrust of life itself.

We didn’t cause that to happen, and we can’t even know directly that that is the case, any more than we can know directly that the Earth is a big ball without actually getting far enough away from it to see its roundness with our own eyes.

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A Liberating Insight

With very few exceptions, pretty much everybody on earth—butcher, baker, candlestick maker, rich, poor, beggar, and thief—each and every human being on the planet is at least as confused, fearful, miserable and afflicted as you are now or have been at some point.

Everybody on earth is at least as blameless as you are and as justified in their actions and beliefs as you are. Nobody on earth is in complete control of what they think, and want, and resist. Not even you.

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Podcast Episode 2: Who’s to Blame?

In today’s episode, John Sherman speaks about why we humans seem so intent on destroying one another and the Earth itself.

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Who’s To Blame?

One morning last August I was reading an article in an old Harper’s magazine about the origins of the First World War. The article explained what was happening in the world at the time, and it described the feeling of being alive then as an all-pervasive state of hopelessness, denial, despair, boredom, and malaise; a lack of interest in life. There was a sense that there wasn’t anything anyone could do to change things.

But with the assassination of the Archduke of Austria war broke loose, and triggered an explosion of excitement in the world. War seemed to offer the possibility of moving out of the swamp of generalized misery and hopelessness into a fresh and wondrous adventure, something which might just restore a feeling of the excitement in being alive. “The war to end all war,” they called it.

All of this was, of course, merely an opportunity to move the blame for the misery that had been festering internally to the enemy outside. And also, of course, that excitement could not, and did not, last very long. Soon all of Europe was smothered in corpses and drenched in blood, and the horror and stench of war covered the earth.

We’ve seen many wars since then.

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